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Monthly Archives: May 2015

The New Biggest Mansion in Los Angeles Will Ask $500 Million

by Bianca Barragan at

 

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McLean Design

The biggest house in Los Angeles has swollen even larger in size and is getting a pretty big ego now too. Bloomberg reports that the finished project will measure more than 100,000 square feet, making it bigger than the infamously unfinished Versailles estate in Florida. The spread is being developed on spec, naturally, and will feature a 74,000-square-foot main residence with a 5,000-square-foot master bedroom, a 30-car garage, a “Monaco-style casino,” and three smaller houses spread across four acres. “The house will have almost every amenity available in the world,” prolific spec house developer Nile Niami says about his latest project. How much will every amenity available in the world cost? $500 million.

If all that doesn’t seem ridiculous enough, don’t worry: there will also be tons of wasted water. One pool is so chintzy; everyone who’s anyone with $500 million has to have four pools these days, and so this place will of course, including one in the basement and another on the second level of the mansion, according to construction permits. As it stands, the landscaping will require “about 20,000 square feet of grass” in the middle of a devastating statewide drought that has provoked mandatory water cutbacks. The mansion’s designer, Paul McClean, says “There a lot of things in the house that will help to preserve water. But those are things that correspond with luxury houses, and I can’t tell you that it’s a green and energy-efficient house.” Originally, plans called for five pools, so maybe that’s what passes for high-end conservation—one less pool than you actually want.

Does the $500-million asking price seem unreal? It is. The LA Business Journal estimated last year that this project would ask “in the $150 million-plus range.” Jonathan Miller, president of appraiser Miller Samuel Inc. (and Curbed contributor), tells Bloomberg “I’m skeptical. My first reaction is laughter. But we’re in this perpetual state of surprise as new thresholds are broken.” If it sells for even half of that, though, it will still be the most expensive sale in the US: the current record holder, an East Hampton estate owned by a hedge fund guy, sold last year for $147 million. (Not too far away from Bel Air, in Beverly Hills, the tacky Palazzo di Amore is waiting patiently for someone to pay $195 million.)

Niami, also a movie producer, is a seasoned spec builder. Last year he sold a humble 30,000-square-foot estate with a dental office in the basement and a 17,000-square-foot mansion in Holmby Hills with an underwater tunnel (Diddy bought that one). Niami is currently “pouring concrete” on his Bel Air record-setter, and expects to be working for about 20 more months on the enormous compound.

Ferrari Tribute to Mille Miglia 2015

The final stage of the Ferrari Tribute to Mille Miglia ended in Brescia yesterday. The Prancing Horse cars left Parma in the early morning and headed for Busseto, the birthplace of Giuseppe Verdi. They then drove on to Cortemaggiore, the home of the famous Trofeo Supercortemaggiore, in which Ferrari was one of the protagonists in the 1950s. However, the sporting high point of the entire Tribute came when the cars did a lap of the Autodromo di Monza, the long-time home of the Italian Grand Prix and one of the world’s greatest circuits along with Silverstone, Le Mans, Monaco, Indianapolis and Spa-Francorchamps. They also drove past the legendary Parabolica, the raised oval that played host to the Formula 1 grands prix until 1961. Having left the circuit nestling in its ancient park and woodland, the Ferraris then powered on to the gem-like city of Bergamo before driving to Chiari and, finally, the finish at Brescia.

Si è conclusa ieri a Brescia l’ultima tappa del Ferrari Tribute to Mille Miglia. Le vetture del Cavallino Rampante sono partite da Parma dirigendosi verso Busseto, paese natale di Giuseppe Verdi, per poi spostarsi a Cortemaggiore, nel Piacentino, sede del celebre trofeo Supercortemaggiore, che tante volte negli anni Cinquanta ha visto le Ferrari protagoniste. Il massimo della rievocazione sportiva però la si è avuta con il passaggio all’interno dell’Autodromo di Monza, da sempre la casa del Gran Premio d’Italia nonché uno degli autodromi di maggiore prestigio nel mondo insieme a Silverstone, Le Mans, Monaco, Indianapolis e Spa-Francorchamps. Le vetture sono passate al cospetto della leggendaria Parabolica, la curva dell’anello sopraelevato che fino al 1961 ha ospitato anche le gare di Formula 1. Dopo avere lasciato la pista immersa nel verde degli alberi secolari, le Ferrari si sono dirette verso la meravigliosa Bergamo prima di fare rotta verso Brescia dove sono arrivate passando per Chiari.